h1

Welcome to the Party: When Christians Put the Caucus Before the King…

November 5, 2012

 

Photo Credit: Here

Have you ever been to a thanksgiving or Christmas dinner that has erupted into shouting or anger looks over politics and political parties?  You would think that being in the presence of family these differences would subside.  And yet they often intensify.  It is not difficult to look across the political arena and see Christians at party conventions fighting and acting very un-Christian-like when it come to the party platform.  Should this be the case?  I would argue no.

If you are a Christian you are a citizen of God’s Kingdom, and your allegiance to that kingdom and your membership in that family should supersede any partisan differences that may exist between you and another person.  What you find with individuals who get caught up in political anger is that they have lost perspective and have come to primarily identify with their political party.  So when you attack that party and its stances, they interpret it as an attack on their very being.  For non-believers political stances may be all they have, and that may be their identity; but for believers we must locate and root our identity in Christ and our allegiance to His kingdom.  As Kingdom citizens, when our positions are attacked we should not return in- kind, in anger or in rage.  Rather we should respond with grace, humility, and honor, confident that our Kingdom is not of this world and our self-worth is not identified with a caucus but with a King who has reigned and will reign forever over the kingdoms of this world.

In his recent book How Christians Should Vote?, Tony Evans answers two questions regarding Christians and political parties, both of which are helpful as we navigate the desire to identify our political ideologies with our faith.

Q: In your book, you says Christians should be like NFL referees when it comes to politics in that they should represent a kingdom perspective rather than identifying primarily with a political party. How can we really know what God’s will is on issues like health care or immigration law?

A: “I believe that there are biblical positions on every issue, but no party fully represents all God’s views consistently on all God’s issues. Christians are going to vote differently because they will prioritize issues differently. My concern is that we’ve so aligned ourselves with the parties of this world that we’re missing the kingdom of God. The proof of that is that we’ve let political parties divide the kingdom of God. My illustration regarding referees is simply to say that while they sometimes vote for one team and sometimes vote for another team, they’re obligated ultimately to neither team, because they belong to another kingdom called the NFL. So, we should never let the party divisions interfere with the unity of the church, causing the church to lose its influence in the culture.”

Q: And yet, white evangelicals are very much identified with the Republican party and black Christians are often identified with the Democratic party. How do they come to such different perspectives on issues?

A: “It’s more priority of issues. For example, the white evangelical community will emphasize right to life in the womb. The black Christian community will emphasize justice to the tomb. For me, those both are one issue, whole life, not term. Since that is one issue with two different locations, Christians can agree on the whole life issue even though they vote differently, and come out with a whole-life perspective that if we were unified both parties would have to interface with and take seriously. Because they can split us up along party lines, we do not have a single voice on the issues that represent the kingdom of God.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: